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December 12th, 2017

Skew Part 4 on Study Group

Filed under: Web Comics — Tags: , , — William Cardini @ 7:48 am

Skew Part 4 has begun on the Study Group Comics site.

Skew Part 4 Cover
Here’s the cover for Part 4.

The first four pages are already up. Skew will update on Sundays.

Here’s a summary of where we’re at in the story: The hypermollusc has exploded. The fate of the Miizzzard is unknown. Bya the Space Yeti runs towards the burnt chunks of the hypermollusc with the remnant of the slime secretly hitching a ride.

Skew Page 144
The exploding hypermollusc.

Skew Page 170
The slime riding on the Space Yeti’s back.

This is the final part, except for an epilogue that I’m saving for a hypothetical print version. You can read the previous parts here.

December 5th, 2017

CXC Recap, Hypercastle Store Updates, and Study Group Comics Forum

Filed under: Event Recap — Tags: , , , — William Cardini @ 7:40 am

Thanks to everyone who bought or traded for a copy of Tales from the Hyperverse and my other books at CXC.

Will Cardini at CXC 2017
A photo of me at the Retrofit / Big Planet Comics table at CXC 2017.

It’s a newer show so traffic is a bit slow but it has great potential. The downtown Columbus library is a beautiful location. I met and hung out with a bunch of great people!

Will Cardini sketch of Destroyer
I did this sketch of Destroyer for Matt Horak’s The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe sketchbook.

If you don’t have Tales from the Hyperverse yet you can now order a signed copy of it (and Sphere Fear and Vortex) from the Store page of this site. I’ve seen evidence on Instagram of copies in the wild in people’s mailboxes and on store shelves. If you read Tales from the Hyperverse, please consider leaving a review on Goodreads, it really helps to get the word out.

CXC 2017 Haul
Here’s my CXC haul.

In other news, I’ve helped Zack Soto add a forum to the Study Group Comics site. We’re still tweaking but come join this new comics community!

September 27th, 2017

CXC 2017 and Tales from the Hyperverse Unboxing

Filed under: Events — Tags: , — William Cardini @ 6:19 am

I’ll be tabling with Retrofit Comics at Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (AKA CXC) this weekend. I’m very excited because it’ll be my first time selling my new comic from Retrofit, Tales from the Hyperverse, and my first time at CXC! CXC is a big event that lasts this whole week, I’ll just be there for the CXC Expo and Marketplace at the downtown branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library, which is from 11am to 6pm on Saturday Sept 30th and noon to 5pm on Sunday Oct 1st.

CXC 2017 banner by Katie Skelly and Sonia Harris

Also, I got some of my contributor copies of Tales from the Hyperverse yesterday and I’m very happy with how they turned out. Here are some photos:

Tales from the Hyperverse unboxing

Tales from the Hyperverse interior

Tales from the Hyperverse interior

Tales from the Hyperverse interior

After I get back from CXC, I’ll add Tales from the Hyperverse to my online store so you can order signed copies. In the meantime, you can already order unsigned copies from the Retrofit store.

September 12th, 2017

Tales from the Hyperverse Debuts at SPX 2017

My new comic from Retrofit, Tales from the Hyperverse, debuts this weekend at the Small Press Expo near Washington, DC!

Tales from the Hyperverse by William Cardini cover

Unfortunately I won’t be there but if you can make it, SPX is a blast. I will be at the next show at which Retrofit is tabling, Cartoon Crossroads Columbus.

And if you can’t make it to either show and you missed out on the Kickstarter, you can preorder at the Retrofit site or wait until I get my copies and can offer signed copies on this site.

September 6th, 2017

KC Zine Con #3 Recap

Filed under: Event Recap — Tags: — William Cardini @ 7:21 am

Thanks to everyone who came by my table at KC Zine Con #3!

William Cardini table at KC Zine Con #3

I had a good show, I sold my last copies of the “Miizzzard Experiments” print on the lower left of the photo. I had higher sales in 2016, but I think it’s because I had a wider variety of newer comics last year, so I’m going to try and increase my inventory for KC Zine Con #4.

William Cardini haul from KC Zine Con #3
Here’s my haul from the show.

Every year KC Zine Con has more awesome exhibitors, I hope the show continues to grow and thrive!

August 24th, 2017

KC Zine Con #3

Filed under: Events — Tags: — William Cardini @ 8:16 am

This Saturday, August 26th, I’ll be tabling for the second time at the Kansas City Zine Con!

KC Zine Con 3 banner

They’ve changed locations this year to the historic El Torreon, 3101 Gillham Plaza, Kansas City, Missouri. The con once again runs from 10am to 6pm and Betty Rae’s Ice Cream, a favorite of my household, will be scooping out delicious treats from their ice cream truck outside!

Drumstick Pit cover

I was hoping to have Tales from the Hyperverse and Warmer for my table but unfortunately I haven’t gotten my copies yet. So I’ll have Vortex, the Vortex risograph posters printed by Oddities Prints that debuted last year, and a print edition of my minicomic, Drumstick Pit. Study Group Comics previously posted Drumstick Pit online but this is the first time that it’ll descend from the Internet to the paperverse.

El Torreon map

I’ll be at Table 102 between the entrance and the Oddities Prints stage.

July 25th, 2017

The Ends of the World by Peter Brannen

Filed under: SF Reviews — Tags: , , — William Cardini @ 8:36 am

Isn’t it strange that you could travel back in time to a point in the Earth’s history when the very atmosphere could poison you?

Of course there are the long years before life on Earth had evolved and there was no oxygen at all. But there have also been at least one period of high oxygen levels when insects could grow to gargantuan size and several periods of extremely high carbon dioxide levels.

In a post on The Atlantic site by science writer Peter Brannen called “Burning Fossil Fuels Almost Ended All Life on Earth,” Brannen vividly details what it would be like to visit one such era, the Permian-Triassic boundary around 250 million years ago:

You walk down to the shoreline and take a few steps into the lapping waters, drawn toward the enveloping gloom. The seawater is almost painfully hot. There’s nothing alive under the waves. There doesn’t seem to be anything alive anywhere really. You squint and marvel at the growing terror on the horizon. You’ve seen billowing thunderclouds before, but this panoramic tempest seems to tower into eternity. Wild hot winds begin to whip in all directions. You find it difficult to breathe. Slowly baking, you know should head back to the temporary safety of the ship, but you linger here all alone on the dimming coast, transfixed by the blossoming apocalypse just over the Earth’s curve. A putrid odor begins to ride in on the swirling winds and, as you finally turn back in a panic, you pass out. Before long, this doomsday storm makes landfall, and what meager life clings to this country is stamped out for millions of years.

Because of this great writing, I bought Brannen’s debut book, The Ends of the World, which came out this past June. It’s a clever, often times beautifully written account of the past five mass extinctions in the deep past of the Earth, when almost all complex species were destroyed by overwhelming geological and astronomical forces. Like the best science writing (I would compare this book favorably to Peter Ward’s Gorgon), Brannen makes the story of scientific discovery an adventure, chronicling contrasting theories of events in deep time through road trips and engaging discussions with scientists. Unlike the common conception of asteroid and comet strikes, geologists and paleoclimatologists now hypothesize that these extinctions were driven by sudden changes in the concentration of carbon dixoide in the atmosphere. One of those changes was a drop, possibly caused by the evolution of trees, which drew down CO2 levels and summoned glaciers. But most of those changes were spikes in CO2 caused by continent-sized volcanic eruptions, huge boils in the Earth’s surface that broke open to bake the land and acidify the seas.

The Ends of the World by Peter Brannen, cover by Eric Nyquist
Cover by Eric Nyquist.

This new understanding of the past is extremely relevant to today because we’re pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a faster rate than those ancient lava flows. Like many, I was scared and panicked about David Wallace-Wells’ article on the worst-case scenario for climate change in New York Magazine. One aspect to many of the projections he collects in the post is that most of them stop, somewhat arbitrarily, at the year 2100. But as Peter Brannen and other science writers (such as Curt Stager in Deep Future, which I discussed in this post) warn us, our actions now will not only affect the next century but millennia to come. That’s why the perspective of deep time is so important to the discussion of climate change and yet simultaneously makes it too abstract for it to become a pressing policy issue for the majority. Maybe some immediate animal fear of being baked from the inside, or losing cognitive function from too much CO2, like Wallace-Wells caused in me, can spur us into action.

One positive fact that I got from Brannen’s book is that, despite many claims to the contrary, we are not (yet) in the midst of the sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history. Even if you add in all the megafauna extinctions, such as the loss of the charismatic giant ground sloths who ate avocados and dug out elaborate tunnel systems in South America, the world has lost only 1% of its species since we evolved. In the five mass extinctions in Earth’s history, the world lost over 75% of its species. There’s still time for us to implement sensible climate change mitigation policies and preserve our world, civilization, and culture for the centuries to come.

If you’re like me and need a chaser of hope for a shot of doom, read this post by futurist Alex Steffen on how climate action is imminent and check out this chat on Vox about Drawdown, Paul Hawken’s project to explore practical climate change solutions that use existing tech.

June 27th, 2017

Preorder a Collection of Poetry Comics about Climate Change

Filed under: Events,Print Comics — Tags: , — William Cardini @ 8:14 am

Hi y’all, I’m involved in another Kickstarter this year!

I have a four page comic in Warmer: A collection of comics about climate change for the fearful & hopeful, edited by Andrew White and Madeleine Witt. They’re raising funds to print the book via this Kickstarter campaign and they have one week and less than $1,000 to go to reach their goal.

Here’s a preview of my comic for the anthology:

Preview from the first page of my comic for the Warmer climate change poetry comics anthology

Any contributions or social media shares are much appreciated!

May 10th, 2017

The Retrofit Kickstarter Surpassed its Goal!

Filed under: Events — Tags: , , , — William Cardini @ 12:02 pm

I was very pleased to see that the Retrofit Comics Spring 2017 Kickstarter surpassed its pledge goal last night with about two days left on the clock! Thanks so much to everyone who pledged or got the word out on social media, I really appreciate your support!!

You still have about 34 hours left to back the project and get all the books at a discount – the $45 print and digital comics bundle is about $30 cheaper than getting the books individually. The campaign ends at 10:59pm CDT on Thursday May 11th.

I’ve got two more previews for y’all. Here’s the table of contents (sans background):

Tales from the Hyperverse

Here’s a crop from one of the pages colored by the incomparable Josh Burggraf:

Dim Red Sun crop

May 4th, 2017

One Week Left to Order my New Comic via Kickstarter

Filed under: Events — Tags: , , , — William Cardini @ 7:51 am

There’s one week left in the Retrofit Comics Spring 2017 Kickstarter!

I’ve been posting previews every day on my new public Instagram, @williamcardini. Here’s a crop from the colored version of my comic “Ghost Arrow,” which will be one of the short comics collected in Tales from the Hyperverse, one of the six books in the latest Retrofit Kickstarter.

Ghost Arrow crop

You can order just Tales from the Hyperverse for $8, all six books at a discount for $45, or all six books and an original black-and-white 9×12″ ink drawing on watercolor paper from me for $150. I’ll draw you the Miizzzard, the Floating Crystal Witch, or whatever you want. I did this for the Sparkplug Books Fall 2014 Kickstarter, here’s what I drew for people then so you can see some examples of my work:

William Cardini ink drawing
A drawing of the Miizzzard.

William Cardini ink drawing
A drawing when I was told to do whatever I wanted.

William Cardini ink drawing
A portrait drawn from looking at a photograph.

William Cardini ink drawing
A drawing of the Miizzzard vs Kid Space Heater for Josh, the creator of KSH.

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